Archive, History

Women’s History Month

Celebrate Women’s History Month by listening to her story. Visit the 2019 collaborative site, https://blogs.loc.gov/whm2019/ for exciting programs. The Library of Congress, National Archives and Records Administration, National Endowment for the Humanities, National Gallery of Art, National Park Service, Smithsonian Institution and United States Holocaust Memorial Museum join in commemorating and encouraging the study, observance and celebration of the vital role of women in American history.

Woman suffrage in Washington, 1916–1918 National Archives “Woman Suffrage Collection” on Historypin

Visit exhibits and online collections to see the Smithsonian’s “Creating Icons: How We Remember Women’s Suffrage”

Opens March 6, 2020
Closes TBD
To mark the 100th anniversary of the groundbreaking 19th Amendment that recognized women’s right to vote, the museum will open “Creating Icons: How We Remember Women’s Suffrage.” Designed to commemorate women’s achievements in winning suffrage, the exhibit will invite audiences to explore how we celebrate, what we remember, what (and who) has been forgotten or silenced over time and how those exclusions helped create the cracks and fissures in the movement that continue to impact women’s politics and activism. A jewel box approach will display a small group of artifacts in conjunction with graphics and media – an interweaving of the “famous” and the “forgotten.” The most impressive piece, a six-foot oil portrait of Susan B. Anthony, will be the centerpiece of the exhibition. Painted by Sarah J. Eddy in 1900, it depicts an idealized image of Anthony being presented with flowers by young boys and girls on the occasion of her 80th birthday. Other Items from the National American Women Suffrage Association collection (now the League of Women Voters) donated to the Smithsonian between 1919 and 1920 will be featured. Materials related to Adelaide Johnson (sculptor of Portrait Monument in the Capitol), Alice Paul (suffragist and activist who helped secure women’s right to vote) and the National Woman’s Party (NWP), and other suffrage and women’s activism collections are included.

Because of Her Story

The American Women’s History Initiative will amplify women’s voices to honor the past, inform the present and inspire the future.
The stories we tell deepen our understanding of women’s contributions to America and the world, showing how far women have advanced and how we as a country value equality and the contributions of all our citizens. (Smithsonian Institution)
Read the stories »

[Portrait of Ella Fitzgerald, Dizzy Gillespie, Ray Brown, Milt (Milton) Jackson, and Timmie Rosenkrantz, Downbeat, New York, N.Y., ca. Sept. 1947]

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